Newsletter

PDF Subscribe

YouTube-Channel

Latest Events and Calls

No events

Judith Szapor

Senior Fellow (01/2018–05/2018)

 

Gender, Race, and the Jewish Family in Hungary after the First World War. Women and the Numerus Clausus 1919–1928

 

SZAPORThis research project focusses on the impact of the so-called numerus clausus law on young Hungarian Jewish women. Introduced in September 1920, the law limited the admission of Jewish students at Hungarian universities to six per cent, the percentage of Jews in the general population. Jewish women were disproportionally affected as it resulted in a de facto ban on women’s enrolment until 1923 and because of the high ratio of female Jewish students at Hungarian universities until the end of the First World War. The legal and political history of the law – which, by normalising the breach of the principle of equal citizenship, prepared the ground for the Holocaust in Hungary – has been well established.

 

Research has also been emerging on the so-called numerus clausus refugees, the Jewish students who left Hungary to study at universities in Austria, Germany, Czechoslovakia, and elsewhere. Yet no study has explored women students’ specific experience or even established their approximate numbers. This project will explore archival and oral history sources to highlight the social and gender history aspects of this phenomenon, including the personal and family strategies involved and the impact on life choices, from marriage to emigration.

 

Judith Szapor is Assistant Professor of Modern European History at McGill University in Montreal. Her publications include the edited volume (with Andrea Pető, Maura Hametz, and Marina Calloni) Jewish Intellectual Women in Central Europe. Twelve Biographical Essays and the forthcoming monograph Hungarian Women’s Activism in the Wake of the First World War. From Rights to Revanche.

Beate Kutschke

Senior Fellow (10/2018–03/2019)

 

Music and Heroisation in Austria. New Perspectives on the Process of Coming to Terms with the Holocaust

 

KUTSCHKEHeroisation has been an important element in the process of coming to terms with the Holocaust across the world since 1945. Jewish and non-Jewish helpers and rescuers, as well as the surviving and dead victims of the Holocaust, have been praised as heroes and heroines for seeking to resist the genocide and/or demonstrating high moral spirit in quietly suffering their fate. While historians, sociologists, and psychologists have acknowledged the significance of these heroisations in the shaping of moral identities and political ideologies during and after the Cold War, the role of music in these processes has been neglected thus far. The investigation of Austria-related ‘Holocaust compositions’ – their music, libretti, lyrics, comments, and performance contexts – will elucidate how the large range of heroic expressive elements in music has reflected changing attitudes towards the Holocaust in Austria, a nation that struggled intensely with facing its past involvement in Nazi crimes.

 

Beate Kutschke is a research associate at the University of Salzburg. She approaches music history from a culturologically oriented perspective. In addition to other research topics such as music and protest and computer-assisted music analysis, she has published on Holocaust music and music and heroism during the past years. The results from her research at the VWI will contribute to a monograph on music and ‘Holocaust heroisations’.

Daniel Cohen
Senior Fellow (09/2018–12/2018)

 

‘Philosemitism’ in Post-Holocaust Europe, 1945 to the Present

 

COHENEuropean antisemitism did not disappear after the Holocaust: Yet, starting in 1945, various forms of philosophical, theological, political, and cultural ‘philosemitism’ entered mainstream public discourse in Western Europe and in the European Union since its inception. My book is a critical history of the main ‘philosemitic’ tropes through which Jews, Judaism, and Jewishness were positively imagined in the wake of the catastrophe: humanism and antifascism in the late 1940s; philo-Zionism in the 1950s; generational rebellion in the 1960s; trauma and human rights in the 1970s; the rediscovery of ‘Central Europe’ in the 1980s; the resurrection of the dead but ‘cosmopolitan’ Jew in the European Union’s imaginary; and, more disturbingly, the more recent use of ‘philosemitism’ in the name of Judeo-Christian Europe under threat.

 

G. Daniel Cohen is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Rice University in Houston, Texas. He specialises in the history of refugees and forced displacement in twentieth-century Europe. He is currently writing a critical history of ‘philosemitism’ in Western Europe since 1945 and in the European Union since its inception.

 

Jacqueline Vansant

Senior Fellow (11/2017–05/2018)

 

The Extraordinary Correspondence of Jewish-Austrian Classmates 1938-1953

 

VANSANTAfter the National Socialists assumed power in Austria in March 1938, a group of 15- and 16-year-old Jewish schoolboys stood on a bridge in Vienna and said goodbye to each other ‘forever’, not knowing what would become of them or where they would finally land: They promised one another that whatever else happened they would do their best to maintain ties. The boys’ original promise resulted in a group correspondence, or Rundbrief as they called it, that stretched over more than a decade and criss-crossed three continents. This correspondence, which consists of 106 round letters or a total of 675 individual letters, has been housed in the Archive of the History of Austrian Sociology in Graz since 1994.

 

Published letters between friends of that age, who experienced the Anschluß, exile, and adjustment to a new environment as teenagers and young adults are rare. The edition of the correspondence will provide readers a unique opportunity to share the experiences and thoughts of this age group, the challenges they faced, and their growth over time. Moreover, the longevity of the correspondence, remarkable in itself, allows us to consider the extent to which the different experiences and environments shaped the boys/young men and their sense of identity.

 

The planned edition of these letters will contribute significantly to exile, Holocaust, and migration studies, demonstrating how maintaining contact with a peer group from a shared cultural background aided the boys in enduring the trauma of exile and transition from exile to émigré.

 

Jacqueline Vansant is Professor of German at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Her publications on Austrian literature and culture after 1945 and in exile include: Against the Horizon. Feminism and Postwar Austrian Women Writers and Reclaiming ‘Heimat’: Trauma and Mourning in Memoirs by Jewish Austrian Réemigrés. Her latest publication in the field of exile studies is Cohesive Epistolary Networks in Exile, in: Helga Schreckenberger (ed.), Networks of Refugees from Nazi Germany. Continuities, Reorientations, and Collaborations in Exile.

Fredrik Lindström  

Senior Fellow (02/2018–06/2018)

 

History and Memory in the Austrian Postwar Period 1960-1988

 

LINDSTROMThe overarching project deals with the “institutional landscape” (Tony Judt) of history writing and memory work in the core period of the Austrian postwar period between 1960 and 1988. Methodologically it relies on Paul Ricœur’s discussion of the interrelationship between the discipline of history and the new field of memory studies, from their common point of origin in the testimony to the representation of the past in historical narratives and public commemorations. The project thus focusses on the formation of different institutional forms of dealing with the past, such as historical commissions, research institutes, and documentation archives.

 

The focus of the research conducted in Vienna in spring 2018 is Simon Wiesenthal’s Documentation Archive of Jews Persecuted by Nazism (1961–2005).

 

Fredrik Lindström studied History at Lund University and spent a post-doc year at the Institute for Contemporary History at Vienna University. He is currently Senior Lecturer of European Studies at Malmö University and has served for several years as Director of Ph.D. Studies at his home faculty in Malmö.

Natan Sznaider
Senior Fellow (06/2017–08/2017)

 

Continuity and New Perspectives. Hannah Arendt and the Sociology of Antisemitism

 

SZNAIDERHannah Arendt was not known as a sociologist, quite on the contrary: She shared many of her Weimar contemporaries’ prejudices against the social sciences and sociology in particular. Yet, a 40,000-word manuscript on antisemitism (only published in 2007 in English translation as part of the edited volume of her Jewish Writings) belongs to her most sociological writings and differs in that respect from her later published and better known writings on the subject. It was originally written in German, during Arendt’s exile in France, probably in the latter part of the 1930s. The essay begins with a historical analysis of Jewish existence in Europe, criticising assimilation and Zionism on equal terms. Arendt set the emergence of modern antisemitism – rejecting the essentialisation of antisemitism by historicising it – in a class struggle between the German aristocracy and bourgeoisie, which she identifies with the emerging nation state.

 

From here, one can argue in more general terms that the overarching conservative fear was that the upper social classes, who were the capstone of society’s arch, were being infiltrated by outsiders whose only distinguishing characteristic was their possession of money. Incapable of understanding the laws of deference that held society together, these newcomers would thus undermine and destroy it from within. This longing for a past in which personal relations were more authentic paints the desire for money as inauthentic by contrast. If society is thought of as once being held together by personal bonds, then money can only be cast in the role of a depersonalising agent, and thus as an agent of dehumanisation. Despite this apparent paradox, however, it was all too easy to personalise this supposed agent of depersonalisation. Conservatives constantly railed against the socially climbing bourgeoisie. The identification of the Jews with money, which Marx himself mulled over in his essay On the Jewish Question, is an all too well-known trope.

 

Thus, beginning with Arendt’s theory of antisemitism, a larger framework of modernity and antisemitism can be developed.

 

Natan Sznaider was born as a child of Polish – and after the Second World War stateless – survivors of the Shoah in Germany. As an adult, he moved to Israel. He is professor of sociology at the Academic College of Tel Aviv-Yaffo. In 2016, he taught at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. His research focusses on cultural memory in Europe, Israel, and Latin America.

 

His publications include: Memory and Forgetting in the Post-Holocaust Era. The Ethics of Never Again (together with Alejandro Baer), London 2017; Herzl reloaded. Kein Märchen, Frankfurt/Main 2016 (together with Doron Rabinovici); Gedächtnisraum Europa: Die Visionen des europäischen Kosmopolitismus. Eine jüdische Perspektive, Bielefeld 2008; Holocaust and Memory in the Global Age, Philadelphia 2006; as well as Gesellschaften in Israel – Eine Einführung in zehn Bildern, Frankfurt/Main (forthcoming).

Senior Fellowships 2017/2018 at the Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI)

 

The Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI) invites applications for its senior fellowships for the academic year 2017/2018.


The VWI is an academic institution dedicated to the study and documentation of antisemitism, racism and the Holocaust. Conceived and established during Simon Wiesenthal’s lifetime, the VWI receives funding from the Austrian Ministry of Science, Research and Economy as well as the City of Vienna. Research at the institute focuses on the Holocaust in its European context, including its antecedents and its aftermath.


Distinguished scholars who have completed their Ph.D.s, have produced works of scholarship and have long-standing experience working at universities or academic institutions are eligible to apply for a senior fellowship. Senior fellows will be able to conduct research on a topic of their choice in the field of Holocaust studies at the institute. Beyond the research work itself, the stay at the institute is intended to encourage communication and scientific exchange among the fellows at the institute. Senior fellows are expected to support the institutes’s academic work and provide research advice and support to Junior fellows. Senior fellows are further expected to contribute to the academic culture of Vienna, e.g., by giving guest lectures and seminars at academic institutions. Senior fellows must be regularly present at the VWI.


Research projects are to focus on a topic relevant to the research interests of the VWI. Within this parameter, applicants are free to choose their own topic, approach and methodology. Fellows will have access to the archives of the institute. It is expected that fellows will make use of relevant resources from the collection in their research projects. Research results will be the subject of formal fellows' discussions and will be presented to the wider public at regular intervals. At the end of their stay, fellows are required to submit a short research paper which will be peer-reviewed and published in VWI‘s e-journal S:I.M.O.N. – Shoah: Intervention. Methods. Documentation.


Senior fellowships are awarded for a duration of between six and eleven months. Fellows will have a work station with computer and internet access and will receive a monthly stipend of € 2,500. In addition, VWI will cover housing costs during the fellowship (up to € 800) as well as the costs of a round-trip to and from Vienna (coach class airfare or 2nd class train fare). There is an additional one-off payment of € 500 available for research conducted outside of Vienna or photocopying costs outside of the institute, where applicable.


Senior fellows will be selected by the International Academic Advisory Board of the VWI.


Applications may be submitted in English or German and must include the following documents:

 

  • completed application form,
  • a detailed description of the research project, including the research objectives, an overview of existing research on the topic and methodology (12,000 characters max.)
  • a list of publications and a CV with a photo (optional).

 

Please send your application in electronic format (if possible in one integral *.pdf-file) with the subject header "VWI Research Fellowships 2017/2018" and submit it by 29 January 2017 to:

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 


If you do not get confirmation that we have received your proposal, please contact us.


Future senior fellows are advised to endeavour to finance a part of their fellowship via a stipend from the Stipendienstiftung der Republik Österreich and to submit an application to this end after they have received notification of being awarded their fellowship.

Senior Fellowships 2018/2019 at the Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI)

 

The Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI) invites applications for its senior fellowships for the academic year 2018/2019.


The VWI is an academic institution dedicated to the study and documentation of antisemitism, racism, nationalism and the Holocaust. Conceived and established during Simon Wiesenthal’s lifetime, the VWI receives funding from the Austrian Ministry of Science, Research and Economy as well as the City of Vienna. Research at the institute focuses on the Holocaust in its European context, including its antecedents and its aftermath.


Distinguished scholars who have completed their Ph.D.s, have produced works of scholarship and have long-standing experience working at universities or academic institutions are eligible to apply for a senior fellowship. Senior fellows will be able to conduct research on a topic of their choice in the field of Holocaust studies at the institute. Beyond the research work itself, the stay at the institute is intended to encourage communication and scientific exchange among the fellows at the institute. Senior fellows are expected to support the institutes’s academic work and provide research advice and support to Junior fellows. Senior fellows are further expected to contribute to the academic culture of Vienna, e.g., by giving guest lectures and seminars at academic institutions. Senior fellows must be regularly present at the VWI.


Research projects are to focus on a topic relevant to the research interests of the VWI. Within this parameter, applicants are free to choose their own topic, approach and methodology. Fellows will have access to the archives of the institute. It is expected that fellows will make use of relevant resources from the collection in their research projects. Research results will be the subject of formal fellows' discussions and will be presented to the wider public at regular intervals. At the end of their stay, fellows are required to submit a short research paper which will be peer-reviewed and published in VWI‘s e-journal S:I.M.O.N. – Shoah: Intervention. Methods. Documentation.


Senior fellowships are awarded for a duration of between six and eleven months. Fellows will have a work station with computer and internet access and will receive a monthly stipend of € 2,500. In addition, VWI will cover housing costs during the fellowship (up to € 700) as well as the costs of a round-trip to and from Vienna (coach class airfare or 2nd class train fare). There is an additional one-off payment of € 500 available for research conducted outside of Vienna or photocopying costs outside of the institute, where applicable.


Senior fellows will be selected by the International Academic Advisory Board of the VWI.


Applications may be submitted in English or German and must include the following documents:

 

  • completed application form,
  • a detailed description of the research project, including the research objectives, an overview of existing research on the topic and methodology (12,000 characters max.)
  • a list of publications and a CV with a photo (optional).

 

Please send your application in electronic format (if possible in one integral *.pdf-file) with the subject header "VWI Research Fellowships 2018/2019" and submit it by 31 January 2018 to:

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 


If you do not get confirmation that we have received your proposal, please contact us.


Future senior fellows are advised to endeavour to finance a part of their fellowship via a stipend from the Stipendienstiftung der Republik Österreich and to submit an application to this end after they have received notification of being awarded their fellowship.

Senior Fellowships 2019/2020 at the Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI)

 

The Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI) invites applications for its senior fellow-ships for the academic year 2019/2020.

 

The VWI is an academic institution dedicated to the research and documentation of antisemitism, racism, nationalism and the Holocaust. Conceived and established during Simon Wiesenthal’s life-time, the VWI receives funding from the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Re-search, the Federal Chancellery as well as the City of Vienna. Research at the institute focuses on the Holocaust in its European context, including its antecedents and its aftermath.

 

Distinguished scholars who have completed their Ph.D.s, have produced works of scholarship and have long-standing experience working at universities or academic institutions are eligible to apply for a senior fellowship. Senior fellows will be able to conduct research on a topic of their choice in the field of Holocaust studies at the institute. Beyond the research work itself, the stay at the institute is intended to encourage communication and scientific exchange among the fellows at the institute. Senior fellows are expected to support the institutes’s academic work and provide research advice and support to Junior fellows. Senior fellows are further expected to contribute to the academic culture of Vienna, e.g., by giving guest lectures and seminars at academic institutions. Senior fellows must be regularly present at the VWI.

 

Research projects are to focus on a topic relevant to the research interests of the VWI. Within this parameter, applicants are free to choose their own topic, approach and methodology. Fellows will have access to the archives of the institute. It is expected that fellows will make use of relevant resources from the collection in their research projects. Research results will be the subject of formal fellows' discussions and will be presented to the wider public at regular intervals. At the end of their stay, fellows are required to submit a short research paper which will be peer-reviewed and published in VWI‘s e-journal S:I.M.O.N. – Shoah: Intervention. Methods. Documentation.

 

Senior fellowships are awarded for a duration of between six and eleven months. Fellows will have a work station with computer and internet access and will receive a monthly stipend of € 2,500. In addition, VWI will cover housing costs during the fellowship (up to € 700) as well as the costs of a round-trip to and from Vienna (coach class airfare or 2nd class train fare). There is an additional one-off payment of € 500 available for research conducted outside of Vienna or photocopying costs outside of the institute, where applicable.

 

Senior fellows will be selected by the International Academic Advisory Board of the VWI.

 

Applications may be submitted in English or German and must include the following documents:

 

  • completed application form,
  • a detailed description of the research project, including the research objectives, an overview of existing research on the topic and methodology (12,000 characters max.)
  • a list of publications and a CV with a photo (optional).

 

Please send your application in electronic format (in one integral *.pdf-file) with the subject header “VWI Research Fellowships 2019/2020” and submit it by 13 January 2019 to:

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

If you do not get confirmation that we have received your proposal, please contact us.

 

Future senior fellows are advised to endeavour to finance a part of their fellowship via a stipend from the Stipendienstiftung der Republik Österreich and to submit an application to this end after they have received notification of being awarded their fellowship.

Senior Fellowships 2020/2021 at the Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI)

 

The Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI) invites applications for its senior fellow-ships for the academic year 2020/2021.

 

The VWI is an academic institution dedicated to the research and documentation of antisemitism, racism, nationalism and the Holocaust. Conceived and established during Simon Wiesenthal’s life-time, the VWI receives funding from the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Re-search, the Federal Chancellery as well as the City of Vienna. Research at the institute focuses on the Holocaust in its European context, including its antecedents and its aftermath.

 

Distinguished scholars who have completed their Ph.D.s, have produced works of scholarship and have long-standing experience working at universities or academic institutions are eligible to apply for a senior fellowship. Senior fellows will be able to conduct research on a topic of their choice in the field of Holocaust studies at the institute. Beyond the research work itself, the stay at the institute is intended to encourage communication and scientific exchange among the fellows at the institute. Senior fellows are expected to support the institutes’s academic work and provide research advice and support to Junior fellows. Senior fellows are further expected to contribute to the academic culture of Vienna, e.g., by giving guest lectures and seminars at academic institutions. Senior fellows must be regularly present at the VWI.

 

Research projects are to focus on a topic relevant to the research interests of the VWI. Within this parameter, applicants are free to choose their own topic, approach and methodology. Fellows will have access to the archives of the institute. It is expected that fellows will make use of relevant resources from the collection in their research projects. Research results will be the subject of formal fellows' discussions and will be presented to the wider public at regular intervals. At the end of their stay, fellows are required to submit a short research paper which will be peer-reviewed and published in VWI‘s e-journal S:I.M.O.N. – Shoah: Intervention. Methods. Documentation.

 

Senior fellowships are awarded for a duration of between six and eleven months. Fellows will have a work station with computer and internet access and will receive a monthly stipend of € 2,500. In addition, VWI will cover housing costs during the fellowship (up to € 700) as well as the costs of a round-trip to and from Vienna (coach class airfare or 2nd class train fare). There is an additional one-off payment of € 500 available for research conducted outside of Vienna or photocopying costs outside of the institute, where applicable.

 

Senior fellows will be selected by the International Academic Advisory Board of the VWI.

 

Applications may be submitted in English or German and must include the following documents:

 

  • completed application form,
  • a detailed description of the research project, including the research objectives, an overview of existing research on the topic and methodology (12,000 characters max.)
  • a list of publications and a CV with a photo (optional).

 

Please send your application in electronic format (in one integral *.pdf-file) with the subject header “VWI Research Fellowships 2020/2021” and submit it by 12 January 2020 to:

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

If you do not get confirmation that we have received your proposal, please contact us.

 

Future senior fellows are advised to endeavour to finance a part of their fellowship via a stipend from the Stipendienstiftung der Republik Österreich and to submit an application to this end after they have received notification of being awarded their fellowship.

Edith Raim

Senior Fellow (10/2016-03/2017)

 

Prosecuting Nazi Crimes in the Other Germany. The Soviet Zone and the Judicial Prosecution of Nazi Criminals, 1945–1949

 

RAIM01This study is conceived as a foundational work from a legal historical perspective on the judicial appraisal of Nazi crimes in the German Democratic Republic from 1945 to 1990. Along with the reconstruction of the justice administration and of the penal foundations (Control Council Directive No. 38, Control Council Law No. 10, Penal Code of the GDR), it analyses the entire East-German efforts at prosecution. The number of East-German cases has not only been notably corrected upwards by contrast to former studies through years of archival work in the Stasi Records Agency, the departure from constitutional principles in individual cases has also been exemplified through an autopsy of the case files. This project analyses (by contrast to West Germany and Austria) the various functions attributed to ‘Transitional Justice’ in the socialist state. It will focus especially on female defendants who at twelve per cent numbered significantly higher than in West Germany (5.5 per cent).

 

Edith Raim studied history and German in Munich and Princeton and worked as a DAAD lecturer in the United Kingdom, at the Haus der Geschichte in Bonn, and at the Institute for Contemporary History in Munich. She is a lecturer of Contemporary History in Augsburg and has published on Nazi history and the post-war era. Most recent publication: Nazi Crimes Against Jews and German Post-War Justice. The West German Judicial System During Allied Occupation (1945–1949), Berlin 2014.

July 2020
M T W T F S S
29 30 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 1 2

 

Current Publications

 

Voelkermord zur Prime Time

 

Hartheim

 

Grossmann

 

Further Publications...

 


The Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI) is funded by:

 

bmbwf en 179

 

wienkultur 179

 

 BKA Logo srgb